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Country or territory where the image was reported

Location (8)

Year the image is reported to have been taken

Year (11)

Classification groups of key explosive munitions used in conflicts

Munition Category (5)

Relatively small projectiles with a distinctive ‘teardrop’ shape
Mortar Projectile
The impact or effect the munition is intended to have

Functional use (7)

The specific model of munition pictured

Tentative Model (99)

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The external organisation that documented the munition

Research Organisation (3)

Colour of the munition pictured

Base Colour (10)

Colour of all, or some, of the markings on the munition

Marking Colour (8)

Language or script of the marking on a munition

Marking Script (8)

Condition of the munition pictured

Condition (6)

Key features defining the operation mechanisms of a projectile

Mechanical Feature (9)

Whether a munition is guided or unguided

Guidance (2)

Where the munition is launched from and what it targets

Domain (4)

The type of fins visible on the munition

Fins Characteristic (5)

The nominal diameter of a projectile. For most modern munitions, this is expressed in millimetres (e.g. 82 mm mortar projectile), but older artillery gun projectiles may be described in inches.

Calibre (28)

Weight class of the aerial bomb pictured

Weight Class (8)

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Mortar Projectile
Relatively small indirect-fire projectiles that generally have a distinctive 'teardrop' shape and fins at the rear, fired from mortars. Mortar projectiles are typically unguided and range from 37 to 235 centimetres in length. Mortar guns have a typical range of between 50 and 9000 metres, meaning they are deemed short-range artillery.
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OSMP260
Analyst Note:
As a result of the rapid introduction of new models and variants during ongoing conflicts, sometimes a munition is issued with a provisional designation, or with no designation at all. In other cases, the designation is not yet known to researchers. (ARES)
OSMP272
Analyst Note:
Whilst most mortars are smoothbore guns, some have a rifled bore. These M1101 120 mm mortar projectiles feature a 'pre-rifled' driving band—that is, a driving band with grooves cut at the factory to fit the mortar's rifling. (ARES)
OSMP250
2 Analyst Notes:
The plum-coloured plastic ring at the nose of this mortar projectile (placed over its fuze) and the black plastic propellant cover (placed over its tail) are both fitted for transport and storage, before the projectile is loaded into a cardboard tube, and then packed into an outer crate. The propellant cover obscures the perforated cylindrical tail assembly in this image. (ARES)
OSMP208
Analyst Note:
The OF-NMR is a rocket-assisted mortar projectile, which uses a solid-fuel rocket motor located in the cylindrical portion of the body, below the ogive, to extend its range. Rocket-assisted mortar projectiles are rarely encountered. (ARES)
OSMP216
Analyst Note:
The “+” marking is a weight classification symbol which indicates standard deviation. One “+” sign indicates a deviation from 0.33% to 1.00% of the stated weight. (ARES)
OSMP169
Analyst Note:
The 120 mm 3-Z-2 incendiary mortar projectile contains 6 incendiary elements, four large and two small. These are hollow steel ‘cups’ filled with an incendiary mixture of an unknown type, but understood to be comparable in effect to thermite. (ARES)